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Thursday / August 17

Learning is Irregular

Outside of school, most people apply learning across disciplines, scenarios, and experiences. For a majority of our lives as students, we are taught in a system that creates blocks of time for learning specific content, much like the factory model of production. However, learning should be life and there is nothing linear about life.

Life is irregular—thus, learning is irregular.

We are in the midst of one of the most disruptive, yet exciting times in history: The Information Age. The rate of change has increased exponentially due the rapid creation of new content that is produced as technology and life have become seamless. The rate of change continues to have an impact on our education system because students today, Generation Z, have only known life with touch screen technology. Vast amounts of information are readily available to them with the touch of a button or finger swipe across a screen. They are also creating more content than any generation in history, so they learn in some fundamentally different ways than we are used to.

The linear, factory system of education is counter to the messy, irregular, and creative learning process that our students have grown accustomed to outside of school. Following are three key points to consider as we are challenged to meet the needs of Generation Z.

  1. Asynchronous technology makes learning a constant activity. With the emergence of online learning platforms and social networking, students are able to connect, communicate, and collaborate with their teachers and peers to extend learning beyond the walls of the schoolhouse and school day. Time, space, and location are now variables in the learning process whereas they used to be the constant. Author Daniel Pink wrote in the foreword to the book, The New Social Learning,

Dan Pink Quote

The use of technology greatly enhances students’ power to learn on their own time, in their own space, and in much deeper ways than ever before. So, let’s embrace it!

Multimedia

  1. We must change how we deliver content due to shorter attention spans. We have quickly become a “sound-bite” society in that we are used to chunks of information shared in a compelling manner. Generation Z takes in thousands of digital images and messages a day, so to make learning more relevant to them, we must not only incorporate all forms of multimedia, but empower students to create and integrate multimedia to demonstrate their learning. If we adopt the use of technology in the classroom, this is a natural byproduct.

Global student

  1. Focus on global skills development through the content we teach. It is often said that Generation Z will change careers 10-14 times before they retire. If this is true, it is impossible to teach them all the content they will need to be prepared for life. We must consider ways to develop the four key global skills of communication, collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking through our specific content areas. Another approach would be to create interdisciplinary courses that provide students the opportunity to apply content in meaningful ways. We should also integrate technology to help students determine what local, regional, national, and global problems they want to solve. This will, without a doubt, create the conditions for students to develop the necessary skills that transcend careers and jobs.

As we grapple with how to catch up to the changing times that occur in every industry outside of our own, we must consider the messy, irregular, and nonlinear learning process and embrace strategies that empower students to demonstrate their learning in meaningful ways.

Be Great,

Dwight

Ideas from What’s in Your Space? 5 Steps for Better Schools and Classrooms by Dwight Carter, Gary Sebach, and Mark White.

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Written by

Dwight Carter is the highly respected principal of New Albany High School, a high school in New Albany, Ohio, that is regularly ranked among the top 100 high schools in the nation. Prior to accepting the position at New Albany High School, he was the principal of Gahanna Lincoln High School, in Gahanna, Ohio, and he played a key role in the design of Clark Hall and the implementation of global skills and technology into its curriculum. In 2013 he was named a national Technology Principal of the Year by the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). He is also an inductee in the Renaissance National Hall of Fame because of his incredible work in developing positive student culture. Mr. Carter has frequently been a guest speaker in schools, universities, and at local, state, and national conferences that deal with Generation Zs, technology usage, staff development, school culture, and other 21st Century education topics. He has authored numerous blogs and has written on behalf of NASSP. During his twenty year career, he has also been a high school social studies teacher, a high school assistant principal, and a middle school principal.

Dwight is the co-author of What’s in Your Space? 5 Steps for Better School and Classroom Design.

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