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Sunday / July 22

Connected Educators

Contributed by Spike Cook

For school leaders, it is imperative to be the change you want to see in your school.  As we understand more about the 21st century, and the changing nature of information, personalized learning, and preparing students for jobs that don’t currently exist, school leaders need to be at the forefront of this change. If the overarching goal for all leaders is to improve the learning environment for students, staff, and school community, then being connected will certainly make your job easier.

Considering that 90% of the world’s information has been developed in the past two years, and technology has accelerated this change, we need to learn how to understand the benefits of being connected. There are many access points for connected leaders to obtain this valuable information. Since social media allows for 24 hours a day 7 days a week access, the opportunities to learn are infinite. Most people now have devices, not cell phones. These devices such as iPads, iPhones, Droids, chromebooks etc. are portable and accessible to the internet. A few moments here and a few moments there will allow for an entire world to be brought alive.

Connected Educators

The more educators who connect through Social Media, the deeper and more authentic learning will be for our schools.

Connected leaders are always seeking to grow and learn. The more educators who take the leap, and connect with each other through Social Media, the deeper and more authentic learning will be for our schools. The ability to connect with other educators, as you will learn, can transform your relationship with your staff, parents, and community. You will see immediate benefits such as:

  • A Personalized Learning Network (PLN) and why is it so important
  • How blogging can help tell your school’s story
  • How blogging can help you become a reflective leader
  • What current research says about being connected
  • How being a connected leader can transform your school community

Throughout my book, Connected Leadership: It’s Just a Click Away, you will read about educators such as Brad Gustafson, an elementary principal who highlights his school in everything he does using Social Media. Then you will get a slice of what the researchers are saying as Jeff Carpenter and Daniel Krutka share their very timely research of 72 connected administrators from around the country. You will learn about Ben Gilpin and how his blog is used to display the power of reflection. Amber Teamann will show you how important a Professional Learning Network (PLN) is to your overall process of connectedness. Theresa Stager, a first year principal from Michigan, will discuss how she has transformed in a short amount of time as a leader and connected learner. Finally, trailblazer Melinda Miller will share her story of how after 8 years, she is still amazed by the role Social Media has played in her leadership.

For more information about how all this can assist you, check out Connected Leadership: It’s Just a Click Away.



Spike C. Cook

Dr. Spike C. Cook is currently serving in a leadership position as the Principal of RM Bacon Elementary for the Millville Public School District located in the City of Millville, New Jersey. Dr. Cook was one of the featured “connected educators” in the 2014 Corwin Press book Digital Leadership by Eric Sheninger. His blog Insights Into Learning received a nomination for the Best Administrator Blog by Edublogs. He is the author of Connected Leadership: It’s Just a Click Away, part of the Corwin Connected Educators Series.



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At Corwin, we have one objective and one objective only: to help educators like you make the greatest impact on teaching and learning.

We offer a host of independent and integrated professional learning options that conform with your budget, your timeline, and your objectives: from books and resources, to on-site consulting and Visible Learningplus, to online solutions, and more. Visit corwin.com for more.

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